Thurs: 4:00PM - 9:00PM, Fri: 12:00PM - 8:00PM, Sat: 10:00AM - 7:00PM, Sun: 10:00AM - 5:00PM

LET’S RANK

Have a fright night with us as we rank the most iconic moments in horror film.


If there’s one thing that fans are known for doing, it’s passionately defending their opinions. In the spirit of that, we present for your consideration this month’s ranked list: Iconic Horror Film Moments.

CHEST-BURSTER – ALIEN (1979)

The scene that revolutionized jump scare horror. Funnily enough, in an interview, the Director of the film Ridley Scott, stated that although the actors were aware of the chest-burster moment – they didn’t expect so much blood.  In turn, the genuine reactions on their faces are priceless. That’s enough to call this our number one pick.


HEADSPIN – THE EXORCIST (1973)

At the time that this movie was released, it certainly had people turning heads (pun intended). This was a cinematic moment where moviegoers saw newly adapted SFX in the growing niche of biblical horror. The main actress of this film, Linda Blair, suffered from extreme trauma and stress from the filming process. Not since The Exorcist has a horror movie truly encompassed a full sense of fear in a film.


SHOWER SCENE – PSYCHO (1960)

Psycho took the routine task of taking a shower and turned it into a nightmare for moviegoers. It was expected that Janet Leigh would be the main character in the feature film – to the surprise of fans, she was killed off a third of the way into the movie. For years to come this would be revered as one of the best scenes in cinematic history from academics and superfans alike – we had to include it.


DINING WITH THE RED FACE DEMON – INSIDIOUS (2010)

This one is a big NOPE for us. Imagine you’re having Sunday supper and the Red Face Demon shows up to party? No thanks. This scene was especially iconic because it was just one you didn’t expect. Typically, you imagine demons and ghouls appearing at night – but this was in broad daylight – it suggests that literally nowhere is safe.


CANOE JUMP SCARE – FRIDAY THE 13th (1980)

After the grueling fight with Pamela Voorhees, you’d imagine that the main protagonist would be in the clear right? Wrong. As Alice escapes on the canoe – out of nowhere – Jason comes up from behind and drags her into the lake. This scene is especially eerie because it happens in slow motion, but nevertheless still has the same impact of any traditional jump scare today.


HERE’S JOHNNY – THE SHINING (1980)

Dubbed one of the first memes – this memorable scene from 1980’s The Shining reminded us that Jack Nicholson, haunted lodges, and spelling things backwards are all super scary.


INTRO – SCREAM (1996)

Babysitters were in high demand after this movie premiered since teens across America were scared to death of staying home alone. Who knew a man in a cheap mask would scare the kids? In this era, we were in dire need of some movie magic and a new slasher villain since the release of Halloween and Friday the 13th.


GEORGIES DEATH – IT (2017)

We’re going with the new version for this one. While the classic is well, a classic – we couldn’t help but feel a sense of discomfort when Pennywise elongated his arm to reach Georgie and drag him into the sewer. RIP.


MONSTER RELEASE – CABIN IN THE WOODS (2011)

While not the most horrifying movie sequence ever, it certainly gets a ton of points for drama, effect and nostalgia. Before the madness, you could see iconic horror movie characters in the containment cubes from the classic zombie, to characters resembling those of the Strangers and Pinhead. That is one elevator ride we’d be happy to avoid.


SINKING INTO THE FLOOR – GET OUT (2017)

Happening in the later part of the film, this scene truly embodied the fear of cognitive paralysis. Missy Armitage takes Chris Washington on an “out of body experience” – literally. While not the most jaw-dropping scene, it is one of our top picks simply because of how realistic it feels.


We are working hard to bring you a ton of interactive and amazing news!
Sign up for our newsletter to receive updates on our FHQ articles.